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The videos cover the key concepts and principles that make Microsoft Access what it is, and subsequent videos explore skills like database creation, querying for data, and using advanced query parameters. A text walkthrough supports each video, with screenshots to guide you, so you can follow those steps at your own pace if you prefer. Microsoft’s tutorials can sometimes be a bit dry, but these videos makes for a surprisingly clean introduction to Access, so don’t hesitate to check them out.

The site is home to thousands of lessons across various subjects, and they’re all available for free. Of those lessons, there’s plenty that cover basic Microsoft Access education.

Most are available in either text or video format both include helpful diagrams and illustrations to guide you along. The nice thing about the course as a whole is that it introduces Microsoft Access’ concepts, before it shows you how to use them. While these aren’t the most in-depth tutorials, they’re great as an introduction and as refresher lessons in case you get rusty and need a few reminders. Though Quackit is technically a resource for web developers, it does contain a short and sweet tutorial series for Microsoft Access.

As such, it should be supplemented with a more in-depth resource. Rich Holowczak is a computer guru who has worked with numerous computer systems leading all the way back to the Apple II and has been teaching computer science for several decades.

Suffice it to say that he knows his stuff. His website is home to many tutorials, but his biggest hit is his Microsoft Access series. Richard Rost is a man who knows about Access. He’s taught it since , alongside other Microsoft Office products, and continues to post regular video tutorials on his website, Computer Learning Zone.

All of Richard’s beginner Access lessons are free to view. It’s over fourteen hours of video training, covering topics like building tables, entering data, designing forms, developing reports, and more. There’s also expert, advanced, and developer lessons, though these come with a charge.

But if you found the beginner course helpful, it might be worthwhile, especially as there’s a student forum where you can engage with others, and with Richard, to ask questions and share ideas. We’d be remiss if we didn’t mention ourselves. Our aim at MUO is to simplify technology, which is why we’ve written a number of Microsoft Access tutorials that are perfect for any skill level.

We’ll guide you through various processes step-by-step, illustrated with clear screenshots. If Access displays a Security Warning message in the message bar, and you trust the source of the template, click Enable Content. If the database requires a login, log in again. For more, see create an Access desktop database from a template. You can either start entering data in the empty field cell or paste data from another source like an Excel workbook.

Tip: Meaningful names help you know what each field contains without seeing its contents. To move a column, select it by clicking its column heading, and then drag it to where you want it. You can also select contiguous columns and drag them all to a new location.

For more, see Introduction to tables. You can copy and paste data from another program like Excel or Word into an Access table. This works best if the data is separated into columns. If the data is in a word processing program, such as Word, either use tags to separate the columns or convert into a table format before copying.

If the data needs editing, such as separating full names into first and last names, do that first in the source program. Note: Access sets the data type of each field based on the information you paste into the first row of each column, so make sure that the information in the following rows match the first row. You can either import data from other sources , or you can link to the data from Access without moving the information from where it is stored.

Linking can be a good option if you have multiple users updating the data and you want to make sure that you are seeing the latest version or if you want to save storage space. You can choose whether you want to link to or import data for most formats.

See Import or link to data in another Access database for more information. The process differs slightly depending on the data source, but these instructions will get you started:.

If you don’t see the right format, click More. Note: If you still can’t find the right format, you might need to export the data first to a file format that Access supports such as a delimited text file. When you link, some formats are available as read-only. Here are the external sources that you can import data or link from:. For more information, see Import or link to data in another Access database. You can use the Table Analyzer Wizard to quickly identify redundant data. The wizard then provides a simple way to organize the data into separate tables.

Access preserves the original table as a backup. The first two pages of the wizard contain a short tutorial with examples. If you see a check box labeled Show introductory pages? If you don’t want to see the introductory pages again, uncheck Show introductory pages?

The rest of the design process varies depending on what you want to do, but you probably want to consider creating queries, forms, reports, and macros. These articles can help:. Introduction to tables. Introduction to queries.

Create an Access form. Introduction to reports in Access.

 
 

Basic tasks for an Access desktop database

 

Though Quackit is technically a resource for web developers, it does contain a short and sweet tutorial series for Microsoft Access. As such, it should be supplemented with a more in-depth resource. Rich Holowczak is a computer guru who has worked with numerous computer systems leading all the way back to the Apple II and has been teaching computer science for several decades.

Suffice it to say that he knows his stuff. His website is home to many tutorials, but his biggest hit is his Microsoft Access series. Richard Rost is a man who knows about Access. He’s taught it since , alongside other Microsoft Office products, and continues to post regular video tutorials on his website, Computer Learning Zone.

All of Richard’s beginner Access lessons are free to view. It’s over fourteen hours of video training, covering topics like building tables, entering data, designing forms, developing reports, and more.

There’s also expert, advanced, and developer lessons, though these come with a charge. But if you found the beginner course helpful, it might be worthwhile, especially as there’s a student forum where you can engage with others, and with Richard, to ask questions and share ideas. We’d be remiss if we didn’t mention ourselves. Our aim at MUO is to simplify technology, which is why we’ve written a number of Microsoft Access tutorials that are perfect for any skill level.

We’ll guide you through various processes step-by-step, illustrated with clear screenshots. There are plenty of interesting things you can learn on YouTube , not least of all Microsoft Access. Each tutorial covers a specific real case for Access: indexing fields, importing from Excel, creating a form, and more. The videos are clearly narrated and are designed for you to follow along and learn.

Besides, the best way to learn is to actually do it. If you have an older version of Access, the YouTube channel has videos covering those too, all the way back to Microsoft Access Plus, there’s more training videos on the Simon Sez IT website , though those come with a price tag. All the above courses and tutorials are completely free to use, but if you’re willing to invest a bit of cash in your education, we recommend looking into what’s available on both LinkedIn Learning and Udemy.

You can buy Udemy’s courses as a one off, while LinkedIn Learning operates on a subscription basis. Note: Access sets the data type of each field based on the information you paste into the first row of each column, so make sure that the information in the following rows match the first row. You can either import data from other sources , or you can link to the data from Access without moving the information from where it is stored. Linking can be a good option if you have multiple users updating the data and you want to make sure that you are seeing the latest version or if you want to save storage space.

You can choose whether you want to link to or import data for most formats. See Import or link to data in another Access database for more information. The process differs slightly depending on the data source, but these instructions will get you started:. If you don’t see the right format, click More.

Note: If you still can’t find the right format, you might need to export the data first to a file format that Access supports such as a delimited text file. When you link, some formats are available as read-only. Here are the external sources that you can import data or link from:. For more information, see Import or link to data in another Access database. You can use the Table Analyzer Wizard to quickly identify redundant data. The wizard then provides a simple way to organize the data into separate tables.

Access preserves the original table as a backup. The first two pages of the wizard contain a short tutorial with examples. If you see a check box labeled Show introductory pages? If you don’t want to see the introductory pages again, uncheck Show introductory pages? The rest of the design process varies depending on what you want to do, but you probably want to consider creating queries, forms, reports, and macros. These articles can help:. Introduction to tables. Introduction to queries.

Create an Access form. Introduction to reports in Access. Protect your data with backup and restore processes. Get started. Basic tasks for an Access desktop database. Need more help? Expand your skills. Get new features first. Was this information helpful? Yes No. Thank you! Any more feedback? The more you tell us the more we can help.

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How to Learn Microsoft Access: 7 Free Online Resources

 
You can either use the default location that Access shows below the File Name box or click the folder icon to pick one. Introduction to reports in Access. Import or link to data. See Import or link to data in another Access database for more information.

 
 

Microsoft Access Tutorial – Be more productive

 
 

His website is home to many tutorials, but his biggest hit is his Microsoft Access series. Richard Rost is a man who knows about Access. He’s taught it since , alongside other Microsoft Office products, and continues to post regular video tutorials on his website, Computer Learning Zone.

All of Richard’s beginner Access lessons are free to view. It’s over fourteen hours of video training, covering topics like building tables, entering data, designing forms, developing reports, and more.

There’s also expert, advanced, and developer lessons, though these come with a charge. But if you found the beginner course helpful, it might be worthwhile, especially as there’s a student forum where you can engage with others, and with Richard, to ask questions and share ideas. We’d be remiss if we didn’t mention ourselves. Our aim at MUO is to simplify technology, which is why we’ve written a number of Microsoft Access tutorials that are perfect for any skill level.

We’ll guide you through various processes step-by-step, illustrated with clear screenshots. There are plenty of interesting things you can learn on YouTube , not least of all Microsoft Access. Each tutorial covers a specific real case for Access: indexing fields, importing from Excel, creating a form, and more. The videos are clearly narrated and are designed for you to follow along and learn.

Besides, the best way to learn is to actually do it. If you have an older version of Access, the YouTube channel has videos covering those too, all the way back to Microsoft Access Plus, there’s more training videos on the Simon Sez IT website , though those come with a price tag. All the above courses and tutorials are completely free to use, but if you’re willing to invest a bit of cash in your education, we recommend looking into what’s available on both LinkedIn Learning and Udemy.

You can buy Udemy’s courses as a one off, while LinkedIn Learning operates on a subscription basis. In fact, the latter offers a month free trial, so you might be able to learn enough about Access in that time. As useful as Microsoft Access can be, not everyone is blessed with a full suite of Microsoft Office software.

If you’re in that predicament, are you out of luck? Not necessarily. Organize data with the Table Analyzer. Next steps. Access templates have built-in tables, queries, forms, and reports that are ready to use. Select a desktop database template and enter a name for your database under File Name.

You can either use the default location that Access shows below the File Name box or click the folder icon to pick one. If Access displays a Security Warning message in the message bar, and you trust the source of the template, click Enable Content. If the database requires a login, log in again. For more, see create an Access desktop database from a template.

You can either start entering data in the empty field cell or paste data from another source like an Excel workbook. Tip: Meaningful names help you know what each field contains without seeing its contents. To move a column, select it by clicking its column heading, and then drag it to where you want it.

You can also select contiguous columns and drag them all to a new location. For more, see Introduction to tables. You can copy and paste data from another program like Excel or Word into an Access table. This works best if the data is separated into columns. If the data is in a word processing program, such as Word, either use tags to separate the columns or convert into a table format before copying.

If the data needs editing, such as separating full names into first and last names, do that first in the source program. Note: Access sets the data type of each field based on the information you paste into the first row of each column, so make sure that the information in the following rows match the first row.

You can either import data from other sources , or you can link to the data from Access without moving the information from where it is stored. Linking can be a good option if you have multiple users updating the data and you want to make sure that you are seeing the latest version or if you want to save storage space. You can choose whether you want to link to or import data for most formats.

See Import or link to data in another Access database for more information. The process differs slightly depending on the data source, but these instructions will get you started:. If you don’t see the right format, click More. Note: If you still can’t find the right format, you might need to export the data first to a file format that Access supports such as a delimited text file. When you link, some formats are available as read-only. Here are the external sources that you can import data or link from:.

For more information, see Import or link to data in another Access database. You can use the Table Analyzer Wizard to quickly identify redundant data. The wizard then provides a simple way to organize the data into separate tables.

Access preserves the original table as a backup. The first two pages of the wizard contain a short tutorial with examples. If you see a check box labeled Show introductory pages? If you don’t want to see the introductory pages again, uncheck Show introductory pages? The rest of the design process varies depending on what you want to do, but you probably want to consider creating queries, forms, reports, and macros.

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